Rideau-Rockcliffe by-election Apr. 15, 2019


Coun. King takes his seat but gets his first snub from the mayor.

Was it a fair election? Rawlson’s path to victory.











Wellar: “Citizens should be entitled to free, easy, timely, and direct online access to public records.”



A victory for those who are suspicious of developer influence at City Hall.

The cajoling starts.

Better services and housing for the marginalized: NOT a priority for the mayor and most councillors.

The mayor can’t be happy that his preferred candidate finished third.


Poll winners (won/tied for most votes): Kasia 1, Johan 2, Rawlson 10, Jamie 11, Maurice 10, Oriana 2, Sheila 4, Penny 5. Penny won the biggest poll (Manor Park). Rawlson won the two next biggest polls (St. Bartholomew’s, Rockcliffe Park). Jamie won the fourth biggest poll (Samuel-Genest).


Turnout was 31% but some socioeconomic groups vote more than others:















The cyclist narrowed his choice down to Rawlson, Jamie or Penny. The dog walker would only tell me she voted for a candidate who would take action on climate change.

This Franco-Ontarien voted for Maurice but Rawlson was his second choice.

Signs for Penny and Maurice on McArthur, but all politicians are welcome here.

One of the mayor’s favourite places.

An 18th candidate?


Rawlson King deviendra le premier conseiller noir. Marc Dorgeville a fini premier pour les candidats francophones.

where to vote
Websites: Rawlson King Sheila Perry Marc Dorgeville Johan Hamels  Oriana Ngabirano Peter Karwacki Jerry Kovacs Chris Penton Patrick Mayangi Maurice Lamirande Jamie Kwong Penny Thompson Kasia Adamiec Idris Ben-Tahir Bruce Faulkner Peter Heyck Miklos Horvath
So many candidates! So much vote-splitting! My best guesses:

“progressive” = more likely to take action on equity issues/climate change (even if it means opposing the mayor);  more likely to make electoral reform (ranked ballots, limiting developer influence at City Hall) a priority

Where they live. Which candidates do you like? Vote here.

Bouncing back and forth trying to decide who to vote for?

This Overbrook resident is leaning towards Rawlson. The CBC says gun violence, affordable housing and transit are top of mind.

The cyclist and the Afghanada vet are both undecided.
This lady can’t make up her mind: “Trop de candidats!”

This former Green Party candidate knows both Sheila and Rawlson from his time on the Overbrook Community Association board and likes them both. Vote here with a ranked ballot.

Trying to make sense of this crazy Rideau-Rockcliffe election?



Jerry offers to kick back 10% of the $105,000 councillor salary to the community.

Are any of the candidates willing to match Jerry? Anybody turning down the generous car allowance?

Anyone vowing to end outrageous partisan, self-indulgent abuses of the $265,000 annual “office budget?”

An end to dining out on the taxpayer’s dime?









Ouch! Not pleasant reading for the many non-bilingual candidates.

Rockcliffe all-candidates event.

How the candidates voted on Jacques Legendre‘s motions. Candidates were rushed into voting  without a chance to discuss. Some couldn’t hear because of sound problems.

















Rideau-Rockcliffe aux urnes. Réponses des candidats.

Which candidates are really serious about income inequality? Answer here.

Maybe Marc has a chance to surprise the pundits?











Many barriers keep Château Donald residents from the polling stations.

Nice work Jamie Kwong! Murals can be a great way to fight graffiti.




Lots of laughs at the Ecology Ottawa 12/17 all-candidates debate.

Tough choice for voters.
Undecided, confused voters in the majority?

“Put us down as undecided.”

“But I like this guy’s face.”

“My dad says I should vote for Jamie.”
“My brother voted for Sheila.”


Overbrook all-candidates event. Short, funny version.


Marc’s thoughts on slow traffic.

Chris’ mom-and-pop proposal.

Many voters are influenced by TV news. CTV coverage:





Will Penny and Kasia split the “conservative” vote?



 


Sign wars rage on Twitter.


April 5 advance polls: high voter turnout: 2,746 voters, more than in 2018!

Exit polls in Overbrook at the Terrasses Francesa revealed strong support for Rawlson, Sheila and Johan, but many other candidates got votes.

Advance poll for social housing residents on Donald Street.

Advance poll in the eastern part of the ward near la Cité.

Exit polls in Rockcliffe: support for Jamie, Penny, Johan, Rawlson and others.

Fierce sign war all over the ward.

Jamie, Penny and Kasia are outspending the others on signs?
The election was a hot topic at this Montreal Road McDo.

“She was here yesterday. We’re voting for her on April 15.”

“I’m voting for Maurice.”

Endorsed by Leiper, Wilkinson and Cullen.

A dark horse?

Endorsed by Menard, Doucet and Harden. A sad story.


Voting can be FUN!

Simulated election with ranked ballots: vote here to find out who’s winning and maybe change the result.

The candidates speak. Another pitch for your vote. Citizen story. CBC story.
Nasty allegations on Reddit.

Ten out of 17 candidates live in Rideau-Rockcliffe (Jamie, Oriana and Chris live in Rideau-Vanier).

Everyone except Penny has agreed to be transparent and reveal who’s financing the campaign BEFORE the election, not after.



Sheila Perry is president of the Federation of Community Associations.

Oriana Ngabirano has advocated for ranked ballots. In October 2018, she participated in the Citizen Jury Demo Project on electoral reform organized by Synapcity.

Rawlson King is in favour and Penny Thompson expressed support during her 2014 campaign.

Marc Dorgeville is a former climate scientist currently working as a budget counsellor in Rideau-Rockcliffe. He is in favour of ranked-choice voting.


Patrick Mayangi supports ranked ballots.

Johan Hamels: “I am in favour of changes that gives every voter more impact on the elections outcome. A ranked ballot would be one of the ways to do that. I can support that.”

Peter Karwacki joined the race as the eight candidate. Chris Penton and Miklos Horvath and Peter Heyck make eleven.


Jamie Kwong is in favour of ranked ballots.

Tobi Nussbaum’s answer to the Ottawa Citizen:


Whom does Nussbaum favour? He has worked with many of the candidates in the ward.

Jamie Kwong was the director of the Vanier BIA/ZAC from 2015-2017 before leaving to work as a consultant with the federal government. She also previously served as the executive director of the Orléans Chamber of Commerce.

Johan Hamels, a former executive director of the Green Party of Canada, has experience with the capital’s francophone school board and served as treasurer of the Ottawa Renewable Energy Co-operative for five years.



Candidates have until 2 p.m. on Friday, March 1 to register ($100 refundable). They need 25 voters to endorse their run for power. Staff have estimated the by-election will cost the city around $329,500.

Will Peter Heyck throw his hat in the ring for the People’s Party?







Whom does the mayor favour? Not Patton!

Jamie Kwong’s campaign launch. Wealthy individuals can give her up to $1200 and get a generous kickback from the taxpayer.

Who is financing her signs? Any developers or moguls who do business with the city?

An endorsement from sketchy ex-councillor Bob Monette is NOT necessarily a good thing.

Generous contributors with no self-interest?

Money wins elections. Will the candidates come clean BEFORE  voters mark their ballots?

Transparency and freedom of information = better governance and…

fair elections. Johan, Rawlson, Oriana, Marc, Chris, Sheila, Miklos, Idris, Jerry, Maurice, Bruce, Kasia, Jamie, Patrick and both Peters have agreed to be transparent and reveal their large campaign donors BEFORE the election, not after.


Some of the candidates are taking the transit challenge.

Not Rick.
sign

signy


How do you win an election? Is door-to-door critical? Big spending on signs? Media coverage?

Debates? Social media? Endorsements? Campaign manager and team? Candidate performance? Support from Watson?

Ken Gray’s take:gray













CBC explains Kettle Island Bridge
Dead or alive?



Dead or alive?













What an exciting race to fill Tobi Nussbaum’s shoes and claim the prize: $105,000 a year in salary, transportation allowances, an office at city hall and an annual office budget of about $260,000.


Seventeen candidates! Someone could win with only 6% support!

How many of the candidates in Rideau-Rockcliffe want to see ranked ballots?

16/17! Solid support for ranked-choice voting!

Try the simulator.

The Community Association Presidents from Manor Park, New Edinburgh, Lindenlea, Overbrook (VP Heather Amys replaced the President)), Rockcliffe Park and Cardinal Glen have met with candidates in the by-election for the Councillor for Rideau – Rockcliffe Ward.

The purpose of the  interviews is to help our residents understand who the candidates are, what drives them to run, and what skills they bring to the table.  There is no intent to endorse or support any of the candidates. Rather, the intent is to provide information to our Association residents so they can make more informed choices among the candidates.

Candidates were given five identical questions one hour before their allotted interview time. Each could answer any or all of the questions in any order they chose, and to the depth they deemed appropriate. What follows is a summation of each candidate’s answers. The order of interviews and answers is based on when they registered with the City and does not indicate a rating.

Candidate #1                          Marc Dorgeville                 http://www.marcdorgeville.ca/

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

My priorities are the environment and social issues.  I believe that an outsider can bring fresh eyes to the processes at City Hall thereby spurring badly-needed innovative thinking.  City Council needs an ideas broker able to accelerate the pace of decision-making.  I want to redress how development planning is done in this City which appears to be based, in part, on asking for citizen input and then ignoring the resulting feedback.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

My children attended a co-operative day care where parents, as a group, provided the necessary care for their, and each other’s, children.  This became a challenging environment insofar as parents often held opposing views on the nature of the care needed and the atmosphere became one of dysfunctional tension.  Knowing that nothing works better than direct, face-to-face interaction in such situations, I was able to diffuse the tension which then led to a positive collaboration among participating parents to the benefit of all the children involved.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

Rideau – Rockcliffe is a microcosm of the City by virtue of its diversity, making it an ideal model for affecting change.  City Council decisions are important for neighbourhoods, transportation, and social change, all priorities in ward 13.  I want to: increase social equality across the Ward; to encourage community participation; to leverage the important role of Community Associations; and to protect Community plans to create a virtuous circle of better health and more engaged communities.  I want to remove the barriers to positive change and to set specific targets for transportation and social housing improvement over a four-year term.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The low level of citizen engagement in Ward 13 is a major obstacle.  Whoever is elected to the Councillor position must work hard to convince folks that he or she represents everyone in the Ward and that their engagement in change processes is critical.  I recognize that the Community Associations within Ward 13 are already working on cohesion and, hopefully, the vocal and active engagement seen in our more affluent sectors within the Ward will become the norm across the Ward.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

Being a volunteer Income Tax advisor for low-income residents in Ward 13 was, for me, a transformative experience.  I empathise with and understand these challenges.  By profession, I was a climate scientist and now work in accountancy.  I have strong analytical capabilities and a fact-based approach to open – minded problem solving.  My accounting training means I can analyse budgets carefully.  This is critical since new funding for social housing and other priorities isn’t likely, so resources must be leveraged from existing program efficiencies and, most importantly, better asset management, including using these to find new revenue streams.

Candidate #2                     Johan Hamels                    https://www.johanhamels.ca/

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I have been in politics since being the teenager who founded the Green Party of Belgium.  I believe strongly in citizen engagement and have not been impressed with how some elected officials treat their constituents.  I work as an international consultant in democracy development. I have been very active in community improvement, mostly through school councils and I place a high priority on bicycles and on improving social housing access in Ottawa.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

As Executive Director of the Green Party of Canada I inherited an organization without a clear focus, a heavy debt load, and no elected MPs.  I reshaped the organization, eliminated the debt, improved communications and by 2016 when I left the position, we had one MP elected and a healthy campaign budget surplus.  I did the same for the Green Party Belgian Regional Government and was their first elected MP.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

My vision is to improve lives together, to make opportunity to succeed more even across the Ward.  I envision a planning process where citizen input is integrated at the get go, not too late in the process to affect change.  I envision a 4-year planning horizon for affordable housing, not a series of one-year efforts that are ineffective. I envision safe and efficient transportation on our streets for pedestrians, bicycles, bus users and cars. I see an officially bilingual City at the forefront of climate change remediation, and I see myself as a two-way bridge between the citizens of Ward 13 and City Hall.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The first challenge is to win over the Mayor and the Council since real impact depends on building effective coalitions.  This Ward is extremely diverse – I have already campaigned door to door at over 1,500 homes in all areas of the Ward, listening to citizen concerns – I believe that true understanding and empathy for problems being faced daily requires your representative to be there, in person. I also propose to speak with Councillors to get their ideas and to implement their best practices within the Ward.  Mathieu Fleury’s initiative to meet each and every business owner in his Ward is a good example of a best practice.  I will rely on youth and willing people as key elements in implementing the vision.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

My tools include: analytical capacity; citizen engagement experience; and political experience.

I have prior experience in finding program efficiencies to free up funds for higher priorities.  In Belgium, a bicycle license was required.  I demonstrated that the cost of fee collection exceeded revenues generated, leading to the removal of the license requirement.

I was able to bring more transparency to public hearings on high speed rail links in Belgium.

As described in (2) above, I was able to eliminate the deficit in Canada’s Green Party.  I delivered over $7 million dollars of solar energy funding for a school and social housing projects in Ottawa.

Candidate #3                     Rawlson King                     www.rawlsonking.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I have been engaged in Community Building for over 10 years.  I am president of the Overbrook Community Association; a Board member of the Rideau-Rockcliffe Community Resource Centre for 7 years; and a member of the Community Equity Council for police services. I have been working on zoning, planning, preserving heritage buildings and acute problems of poverty and public safety. I want to improve the quality of life across the ward by dealing with acute issues such as public safety, and poverty, in particular.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

I was working with our Councilor’s office and police service to address a homophobic incident in the community.  We involved “Mediation Ottawa” to help us keep the majority of people in the room, to have a constructive dialogue around social inclusion.  I encountered resistance to the process, recognized the divergence of views, confronted the situation and succeeded in having a positive community conversation. We were able to address concerns, lower the anger and improve understanding.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

Improving the quality of life drives all my volunteer efforts.  I am results driven. I see an achievements – driven environment with an end results focus on clear and attainable goals.  I see substantial reduction in crime rates among youth which is why I helped create the Youth Strategy for the Ward. Sixty percent of crime is committed by youth, and 50% of the children in social housing live below the poverty line.  I see public safety and child poverty as mainstream concerns, not just pasted add-ons.  I see continued successes in: park designations and maintenance; and in reconfiguring transit to align routes better with social housing access.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The City of Ottawa governance structure is very complex.  Council members have different viewpoints that colour their perceptions of many issues.  We need to work hard to talk it through, to have frank, fulsome discussions in a concerted effort to increase mutual understanding and move to a consensus.  That consensus must be based in a holistic view of the Ward and the City, a view ultimately driven by common sense.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I am very diplomatic and try to be a good listener.  The key actors in ward 13 and the City know me and know that I am also connected to the residents in my community.  As complexity increases, silos become less and less effective, we need a holistic view of neighbourhoods.  We need social inclusion so everyone feels part of the process.  Politics is more of a role than a job – elected officials must not feel entitled.  We need to push complacent decision-makers to change their mindset away from always opting for the most politically expedient solution. I have learned that the course of least resistance doesn’t often deliver the concrete solutions needed.

Candidate #4                     Jamie Kwong                                     www.jamiekwong.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I have worked as the Executive Director of the Quartier Vanier Business improvement Area (BIA) and the Orleans Chamber of Commerce, always in partnership with various levels of government.  While I want to exploit the synergy between local small businesses SMEs and their community, I want to come back to the community with a broadened mandate and have a direct impact on the community.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

When I arrived, the BIA lacked vision, goals and action items.  As a silo, it couldn’t generate the cohesion for meaningful change.  I built trust within the community through collaboration and I am now known for my efficiency, vision and my results focus.  Together, we achieved more beautiful streetscapes, a more walkable “Main Street”, and a stronger link between local small businesses and the community.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to Go Big and to Go Bold. Based on early consultation I want to develop an innovative collaboration experience with credible argumentation that addresses the required “what’s in it for me” to generate buy-in.  I am interested in fostering entrepreneurship through connecting SMEs to the community to achieve balanced growth.  I care about education, investment and crime prevention.  I believe Ottawa needs to grow in a balanced manner.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Most obstacles can be overcome with effective collaboration, connection and bold action.  A community vision tied to early consensus building stemming from an innovative, resourceful effort is key.  The start is neighborhood consultation where best practices are demonstrated with early feedback to show how community ideas were incorporated into the strategic plan.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I have experience building effective collaborations at City Hall.  I have advocated for and continue to believe in the importance of Community-based policing to prevent crime and encourage investment.  I am a resourceful, tenacious advocate for positive change.

Candidate # 5                    Oriana Ngabirano                             www.voteoriana.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I want to change how we do politics, to be personable and easy to relate to.  I believe that the solutions to many of our problems already exist but we can’t get past roadblocks due to a lack of will and engagement.  A positive attitude leads to positive actions and positive change.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

In Mali I worked with the Save the Children program with staff who lacked engagement.  As part of a Global Day of Action I built three separate, region tailored communications plans, all based on the basic values behind the program and linked to international goals.  The campaign re-energised the staff, received #1 ranking on social media, and led to the infusion of $26 Million in additional funding.  Mali is as diverse as Ward 13 but common alignment is the key to achieving common goals.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

My vision for the City is the same as for the Ward.  We can live well if we work together instead of in silos.  We need better transit to connect people, we need community – based initiatives driven bottom up, not top down.  The Ottawa Community Housing model doesn’t work.  We need mixed income housing to provide role models for success.  Support for cycling will help revitalize the city as cars are replaced. I want to open youth entrepreneurship camps in the less affluent parts of the Ward.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The largest obstacle is political apathy since only about 38% of eligible voters bother to cast a ballot.  Communications are inadequate; we need open conversations even with those who don’t vote currently to convince the 62% who do not vote of the value of political engagement.

5.What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I am a solutions – oriented communicator and coalition builder.  I keep groups that I work with focused on tangible deliverables. I believe that I can bridge the urban versus rural Councillors divide at City Council, building a collaborative framework, clear visions and achieving positive, concrete actions.  The keys to success are honesty and a heterogeneous focus.

Candidate #6                     Penny Thompson                            https://www.votepennyt.ca/

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I want to improve the quality of life in both the Ward and the City.  The key to achieving this is to connect people.  I have a long history of community service having headed the Manor Park Community Association (MPCA) and, more recently, being involved with the United Way SPARK program which is about women supporting women. For example, we recently funded an exciting musical project in Overbrook.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

The proposed East – West bikeway on Hemlock Avenue was of great concern to residents living on the street.  At an MPCA meeting their voices were heard clearly so I invited City staff to a follow up meeting where solutions also eluded us. I continued to work the issue and found a solution, parking pockets that was acceptable to residents and traffic planners.  Although a difficult process, I stuck with it since, in the longer term, the proposed bikeway was “the right thing to do” We make decisions now for future generations, even if it ruffles a few feathers.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want a more livable city with a neighbourhood focus.  We need more than just resident engagement – we need resident – centric decision-making so as never to have another process like the CSST in New Edinburgh.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The current consultation process is fatally flawed.  We need resident consultation as step one of any major project to collect input and feedback at project inception.  Right now we suffer from a lack of transparency and a lack of resident outreach in City Hall decision – making processes.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I have proven time and again that I am both reliable and honourable.  I have 25 years of experience as a volunteer in Ward 13.  As MPCA Chair, I fought the island bridge proposal for 10 long years.  My connectivity skills and listening skills led to my appointment as Chair of the Environmental Stewardship Committee for the City.  In this capacity, I led the Greenhouse Gases Discussion Day.  I was also part of the Wateridge Village Advisory Group and instrumental in the redesign of St Laurent Boulevard as an integral part of Wateridge Village traffic planning.

Candidate # 7                    Patrick Mayangi                                  www.patrickmayangi.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

As a 14 year resident in Ward 13, I have always lived in social housing, supporting my family with part-time jobs since I was 16.  I attained first a bachelor’s degree and then a Master’s degree in local representation in civil society. My concern is always about caring for others. I see the power of youth and I want to get youth involved in politics.  I volunteer a lot, and when I met Tobi Nussbaum he was a great inspiration to me, and a breath of fresh air.  I want to bring positive change; improve social housing and get young people represented in local politics. I want to be part of it.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

The candidate chose not to respond directly to this question

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

The City needs ambition and vision. I envision healthy vibrant communities.  The City of Berlin is an example of a Smart City, dynamic from its core to its outer extremities; so unlike Ottawa that seems to be a dormant city.  We are socially diverse in Ward 13 and we need to be aware of who our neighbours are and to understand their needs if we are going to be able to revitalize disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the Ward and the City.  Can we get school lunch programs added to our already successful school breakfast programs?  Money is the least of our problems.  Can we attract technology giants such as Shopify to bring state-of-the-art technology to our Ward? I want Rideau – Rockcliffe to be a model for other wards.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Short-sighted decisions such as the recent annulation of free university tuition programs will mean that many of my peers will be unable to fulfill anywhere near their potential to contribute to an open vital society.  We need to look past the next election cycle in decision-making for programs ripe with potential medium to longer – term benefits. Heritage is important. We cannot move into our future without understanding our past but I am mystified as to how a project such as the CSST gets supervised when cost over runs and delays are everywhere apparent.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

My youth is my best tool to motivate other youth.  Younger role models bring fresh visions.  I am already well connected to Mathieu Fleury and to the Catholic Immigration Centre where I mentor new immigrant kids on how to become part of our social fabric.  Leadership needs 3 things; moral fibre, a coherent dream, and the tenacity to pursue the vision.  I can bring great thoughts and ambitions having lived in social housing and I’m still living the reality of social housing in the neighbourhood.  My slogan is: Come Together!   Rideau-Rockcliffe because without that first step, nothing positive is possible.

Candidate # 8                    Chris Penton                      www.votepenton.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I was born here and returned 10 years ago.  I developed the Vanier Market; I have chaired the Vanier Community Association; I built the new Beechwood Market; I envisioned and realized East Fest. Now I want to apply my many life lessons and my extensive local experience and connections to improving the quality of life in the Ward as your Councillor.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

I conceived and realized East Fest over the objections of City Transportation staff who strongly resisted street closures and bus diversions in collaboration with sponsors.  I provided personal bridge financing to make this a reality in the first year.  To make this happen required a common vision among collaborating community groups, all of which I facilitated.  Now in its third year, East Fest is a BIA self-sustaining success story.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I envision a safe, walkable, serviceable (pools & parks) and vibrant community focused on pedestrians and cycling.  To make it happen requires better management of existing funding and programs.  We need more resident input into transportation planning, better access to the LRT.  We need Community Policing and we need to make the economic development and bike lanes on Beechwood work better. I will schedule regular consultation meetings with all Community Associations.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Red tape at City Hall is a huge problem.  Another is the lack of transparency as in the CSST – we need to open the currently closed doors processes, to stop taking residents for granted.  Developers cannot continue to see Ward 13 as a blank canvas for development. Planning and development are key and with resident- centered processes, citizen input will be the first step in the consultation towards eventual consensus.

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I am a resourceful and committed problem solver.  I recently ran the Salvation Army Red Kettle collection campaign, organizing all facets of the operation and collecting over $500,000 in revenues.  I have owned and operated two adventure travel companies.  I step up, am fast on my feet, collaborative by nature, approachable with good listening skills and a strong work ethic. I gain trust quickly and know how to organize and work effectively with teams of volunteers.  I am an experienced, credible, connected and confident voice at City Hall ready and willing to serve.

Candidate # 9                    Peter Karwacki                    www.peterkarwacki.blogspot.com

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I come from Kenora in north-western Ontario and I bring a frank, no-nonsense perspective to the issues facing Ward 13 and beyond.  We need solutions to provide better life opportunities to bridge the gap between haves and have-nots.  We have issues such as transit access, food security, and homelessness along with youth-based crime that require attention now.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

In Kenora, access to our home was by means of a gravel road maintained by the City.  One time I complained about service only to find that mean-spirited City staff cut off all services since this was technically a common access road not owned by the Municipality.  I did my homework; took the City to court; prepared and pled my own case against City legal staff.  The result was a court order for Kenora to buy and maintain into perpetuity the road and congratulations from the presiding judge on my thorough case preparation.

3. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to develop a broad-based new mindset for neighbourhood resilience.  City Hall is full of cozy relationships that seem to make cooperation easy, but doing it differently can get messy and thick skin is required.  In this, I want to continue the work of Tobi Nussbaum and to use him as a mentor to work through these complex issues.  I fear that our indebtedness is leading to a day of reckoning where resilience will take the shape of self-reliance meaning new ways to provide essential services.

4. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Tobi’s attempt to reform City Hall processes were largely rebuffed and he was intentionally sidelined.  I will continue to ask the tough questions at Council; to hold politicians and City staff accountable for their actions and their inaction.  Does anyone really think that $75,000 thrown at the Overbrook 4 corners issue will be enough to make young unemployed youth not see crime as an alternative to an unsuccessful job search?

5. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I have extensive pertinent experience – hospital administration; IT solutions development; Health Care Board member; Project Management expert.  I am very analytical and can use my good judgment to separate the wheat from the chaff.  I am frank to the point of bluntness (I’m working to soften that a bit) and not easily intimidated by politicians in power or by staff experts looking for expedient, least resistance solutions that are really only temporary band-aids.  I can, and will, ask the tough questions.

Candidate # 10                            Miklos Horvath                       https://www.votehorvath.ca/

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

My concerns include the lack of vision and ambition in the city, indeed the layout of the city itself.  LRT is doomed without Phases 2 & 3 that are no longer certain.  Winter snow clearing, potholes repair and other municipal services are a concern.  As per Tobi, I will want to have my voice heard at Council where too many Councillors are OK with the status quo.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

In 2000, I was campaign manager for the Ottawa – Vanier PC candidate.  I started at zero and built a team of committed volunteers and raised sufficient funds to run a robust campaign in a longshot riding.  We were recognised by Joe Clark as having built a model riding association from scratch.

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I see an interconnected city with high speed rail links to Toronto and Montreal; with a regional commuter system built on existing rail lines; and reliable urban transit with transparent, public performance measures.  I see development sensitive to quality of life issues such as shade cast on nearby residences; accessible buildings; walkable, healthy neighbourhoods.  I see a public dashboard for services delivery performance measurement – how long to clear snow; to fill potholes; to collect garbage, etc.  I see rental subsidies in lieu of motel-based housing. Development is an issue for example Minto’s empty space. Small entrepreneurs are not able to afford developer’s rent and this is leading to dead zones along Beechwood. Infills do not fit the neighbourhoods. 

4. What are the obstacles to implement your vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

All too often, developers want to build what they can sell, not what fits into the neighbourhood. With City Council split between urban core and suburban members, even best practices cannot often find a consensus.  In my line of work, internal audit, I work in a team focused on streamlining delivery processes.  We have about three months to understand a situation before recommending change.  This analytical capacity will serve me well at Council.

5.What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

I have built committed teams of volunteers who have bought into a shared vision and a new system.  I know how to get past the roadblocks placed by City Staff.  I need to learn more about complex Overbrook issues around child opportunities and crime, and I am committed to do so. I believe my focus on performance standards and transparent service delivery reporting will enable program efficiencies and a greater chance of meeting clear output targets.

Candidate # 11                                  Peter Heyck                       No Website Listed

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I’ve been interested in civic and political issues for some time.  While I’ve volunteered and worked for a number of federal and provincial campaigns over the years, I believe that I can do the greatest amount of good working at the local level in municipal politics.  It is the best place for me to start.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

Where I work, Canadian Blood Services in logistics, it’s important that we work together as a team in order to meet deadlines.  We ship life-saving drugs and blood products to hospitals and clinics all over Canada.  If we don’t meet deadlines, surgeries get postponed, putting patients at risk.

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I would like Ottawa to be a leader in a number of areas, such as improving our environment, improving public transit, and creating permanent housing for the transient population.  Having a permanent address is a precondition for applying for the wide range of social assistance programs available. Affordable housing does help the homeless or the transient populations who I am concerned about. I am a believer in Housing First. While it not a Ward 13 issue, I am very concerned about the Salvation Army Shelter. That many people on the street during the day is not good for the neighbourhood or businesses on Montreal Road.

4. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

I see City Council and the Mayor as obstacles to some of these goals.  It will be challenging to allocate funding in the City Budget to my priorities when the Mayor favours developers.  Not everyone is going to agree on how best to solve these problems, so developing positive interpersonal relationships will be key from the moment I arrive.

5. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

My ability to communicate clearly and effectively

My ability to identify a problem and work towards a solution

My strong preference to work within a team environment in order to achieve common goals, rather than trying to go it alone (avoiding duplication and working at cross purposes).

Candidate # 12               Maurice Lamirande              http://mauricelamirande.com/en/

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

Rideau – Rockcliffe has several issues to address.  My campaign slogan is “A Real Voice at the Table” and that voice will be yours, collectively.  I plan to hold Round Tables every 3 months to address issues in each zone of the Ward to foster two-way communication.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

As a School Board Trustee, I dealt with school closures in the 1990s and amalgamation of School Boards.  In the end, most stakeholders were happy with the results.  My success depended on communication and active listening skills at the group and individual level.  Another key element is to be respectful and build good relationships with other Councillors.

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to improve affordable housing particularly for Seniors who are the most vulnerable.  I will bring back building superintendents in City-owned buildings so that Seniors have someone to talk to about their concerns. I will also address drug problems and the like in mixed – use residences that used to be only for Seniors.

4. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

Ottawa is 25 years behind modern cities in terms of urban transit.  I favour the LRT extension but want to understand the billions of dollars cost overruns.  Why do the trains not work in winter?

We need effective LRT from Kanata to downtown and Embrun to downtown.

How did Lebreton Flats turn into such a big mess with millions of dollars wasted?

My Round Tables will ensure closer collaboration with the community and better decision making.

5. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

Communications is my primary tool.  Mutual respect is also critical to build real collaboration. Transparency and integrity are also essential components.

One must stay positive, negativity doesn’t get one very far.  I am accepting no donations for my campaign so as to owe no one if elected. Neutrality is important – one should not be in the pocket of developers.

I am a hard worker who enjoys serving others.  From my beginnings as a bus boy at the Chateau Laurier through my School Board Trustee experience to now being a maintenance contractor, I have enjoyed providing good service to my clients and constituents.

Candidate # 13                                  Kasia Adamiec                                   https://votekasia.ca/

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I want to be an independent and strong voice at City Hall on behalf of Ward 13.  Community safety is a key priority for me.  Democratic processes are dear to my heart so we must respect each other while trying to build a better community. 

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

As a former Councillor’s office staff member I never left a single constituent request unanswered.  I know how City Hall operates and I have personal relationships with Councillors on both sides of the urban – suburban divide.  I want to help those who need help and to add more transparency to City Hall decision-making.  I work as an intelligence officer for the National Parole Board where, after research, I recommend the granting or withholding of parole.  The consequences of error are potentially extreme, so I do my homework carefully.  These analytical skills are key to what I offer to the Ward as Councillor.

On the Salvation Army issue, most Councillors knew that the plan was poor but they voted for it anyways so as to avoid the option of having distributed centres proposed for their own Wards.  This was NIMBY at its worst and an example of what needs to be addressed in City Hall decision-making.

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I see a city with a great quality of life.  In Ward 13 I see: a revitalised Beechwood Avenue; the ability to bike or walk to work; safe, efficient and affordable interconnectedness is my priority. City Hall needs to take a step back in catering to suburbia and develop a greater central urban focus with elements such as Community Policing, interconnectivity to the LRT, more timely snow clearance.  Here is one example – It takes me 45 minutes to get to work on a bus – I can walk it in 55 minutes.  How is it that the City can offer Orleans residents a 35 minute express service to downtown when my commute is less than 25% of the distance but takes so much longer?

4. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

City Hall is currently focused on gridlock in suburbia.  There are several cliques in operation with an Us versus Them mentality.  I will not be part of a “Yes Sir” clique, even if it means going it alone at times. I want to find budget efficiencies so as to spend money in the right places on things like fixing the lack of interconnectivity to the LRT, community policing, snow clearance, bikeways, and so forth.  With services budget cuts on the way from the Ford government, we will need to work hard to find efficiencies to fund any new programs or even maintain existing ones.

5. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

I am a determined individual, not afraid to take risks.  I am a passionate leader with great leadership skills.  I have served on Neighbourhood Watch Boards, on the Ottawa Police Youth Delivery Committee.  I am bilingual, but my languages are English and Polish.  I am committed to operate a bilingual (English – French) office and am learning French, having married into a Francophone family.

I have significant political experience; I can navigate through red tape; I know how to and am not afraid to take tough decisions whether politically positive or negative. I will work collaboratively with Community Associations and institutions such as the RRCRC, with SMEs and entrepreneurs in the Ward, to work towards effective change.

I know that there will be roadblocks at City Hall, and from the Province and I am confident in my experience and my persuasiveness to get past as many as possible.

I want to reach out to the people in the Ward who don’t see us yet as an Urban Community and to engage them in a collaborative process for positive change.

Candidate # 14                                  Jerry Kovacs                       No Website Listed

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

The terrible conditions of our roads and streets this winter is one force,  Municipalities should be able to deliver good quality services at an affordable cost – Ottawa can do much better.

The Salvation Army issue was badly handled with no transparency – again, we can do better.

The tensions between urban and suburban Councillors paralyses innovative thinking.  They need new infrastructure; we need better maintenance of existing infrastructure – there must be a way to bridge that gap.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

While teaching Wills & Estates class, I noted that about half of the students were attentive, the remainder not so.  I made up 40 numbered cards and distributed these throughout the class.  Then I asked the even numbered folks to move to my left, the odd numbered to the right.  This broke up the groups distracting the others and led to more attentiveness among all students.

Councillors at City Hall occupy the same seat for their 4-year term.  Why not mix them up?

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

My vision is irrelevant – I will be there to represent the vision of the Ward.  The new Official plan consultation process affords a great opportunity to bring all stakeholders together. We need more respect for Community Design Plans that have been run over by Council.

Vision must be community – based and a Councillor’s main role is that of facilitator and information gatherer along with communicator.

4. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

The Inner City versus Suburbia divide on Council is the largest obstacle to progress.  The Ward 13 Councillor must develop positive relationships and find areas of common agreement.  Consensus building begins with areas of agreement; next are areas of strong disagreement; finally, areas where compromise and consensus can be developed.  The object is to build consensus for win – win outcomes across the City.

5. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

I am a dispute resolution, mediation lawyer by trade.  I am an educator committed to life-long learning.  Having run for the Councillor seat where I reside last year (Ward 14) I have a decent understanding of how City Hall works.

I would open a Community Service Office in the Ward and move into the Ward, if elected.  I will allocate 10% of the Councillor salary to community purposes within the Ward.

Candidate # 15                                  Idris Ben-Tahir                                   No Website Listed

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

In past years, I have run for election as an MP, Councillor, and School Board Trustee. Ottawa thinks small when it should think large. Luxembourg is the size of Ottawa but far wealthier as a banking centre.  Ottawa could become an international banking centre also.

The cost of security for Embassies in Ottawa is very high.  Consideration should be given to creating an enclave of embassies, grouping them in a common area such as at Anderson Road near Mer Bleu.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

I have a lengthy history of community service, often tied to supporting ethnic minorities such as the Somali community, Kosovar refugees, Turkish earthquake victims, compensation for Japanese-Canadians wrongfully incarcerated during WWII.  In each of these cases, extensive lobbying and negotiation gave rise to positive solution for all involved.

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to bring back Community policing to reduce crime rates that are too high.  I believe that we should license sex trade workers and collect taxes from their wages as per other working Canadians.  I want to support various ethnic focused community activities centres in the Ward – whether Lebanese, Somali, Iraqi or whatever.

I want to build a southern traffic loop from Edwards to Richmond and Arnprior to divert much of the truck traffic off of HWY 417. This loop would bring added growth through housing and other investments.

4. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

Candidate did not answer this question directly.

5. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

I am an active community member on the lookout to help those in need.  I have helped several ethnic communities in Ottawa and understand the issues facing them.  My military recruitment experience is also an asset.

Candidate #16                                 Bruce Faulkner                                  No Website Listed

Mr. Faulkner did not participate in the Candidates Interviews

Candidate # 17                                  Sheila Perry                     www.sheilaperry.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I want to build a liveable Ottawa together.  I have been building partnerships since 2010.  I want to use my energy, my commitment, my knowledge and my passion to address the many issues facing this diverse Ward.

2. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

I started work on Ottawa’s Official plan in 2013 when players at City Hall were very different from those of today.  We have a great opportunity here with a new City manager to build Ottawa beyond 2016.  Over the years, I have gotten to know the key players, built trust and this has led to common understanding.  There are now 17 papers on the Ottawa web site on subjects such as Data, Transportation, Housing and so forth.

I have advocated for and made a difference to the Boys & Girls Club, Syrian refugees, disenfranchised Ward constituents.  I have been President of the Overbrook Community Association; I am the current President of the Federation of Citizens Associations and I have served in a leadership capacity on dozens of other groups.

3. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to build a liveable, and better Ottawa.  We need safe neighbourhoods with engaged youth.  We need detailed data to drive fact-based decisions.  We need to have Ward meetings, strong communications and strong partnerships with Community Associations and others in this very diverse Ward.  RRCRC is pivotal to this vision.

4. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

There are no service delivery standards in Ottawa and no evaluation.  Time and again there is no plan, no staff, no strategy and no money to effect change.  Many among the disenfranchised within the Ward have language issues and lack even a facility to meet.

I write proposals and initiate actions that are sent to Councillors for review: Some come onside, others don’t even reply.  The split mirrors the likely 14 to 7 vote on the upcoming budget.

5. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

I was very instrumental in having the Overbrook Community Centre built.  This is only one element in my extensive experience.  I am a member of the Overbrook Planning & Development Committee, and I understand the challenges of infill.  I have convinced the Committee of Adjustment to insist on community vetting prior to the review of any applications.  I am part of the Linking Leaders Group focused on reducing youth homelessness by 30%.

I am an active listener, a proven leader and a tenacious problem – solver.  I have more experience dealing with Ward issues than any other candidate and I look forward to representing Ward 13 at City Council.