don’t drink the water


Bells Corners pentagon.

More business for Bells Corners coffee shops? Tim Hortons closed at the new military headquarters. Don’t drink the water!



DND will consolidate its 40 facilities across the national capital region into a small number of locations, with more than half of its 16,000 local staff stationed on the old Nortel campus.

The troubled project has repeatedly fallen behind schedule, disappointing politicians, real estate agents and the taxpayer. DND had originally wanted around 3,400 staff at the campus by March 31, 2016. The latest goal is 1,500 staff by the summer of 2017.



Looks like the LRT station will be on the east side of Moodie on NCC land.

So the Maintenance and Storage Facility will also be on the east side.


Bellwood: trailer parks as homes of the future.

Fewer tax breaks for the 1%.

Wealthy Bells Corners strip mall owners might have to lower the rents instead of letting space sit empty along the Robertson traffic sewer.

Bells Corners Sustainability and Redevelopment

The Bill Teron/Lloyd Francis/Donald Sim Lynwood Plaza in the early Sixties.

Westcliffe in the Seventies.

More proof that Facebook is the devil.




Where will you get your news when Postmedia dies and real journalists are replaced by Facebook hustlers and $elf-promoting crooked politicians?

The dying mainstream media are the conveyor belt of information between citizens and the people who govern them. They are the main source of external accountability and non-fake news.

Sad to see the Citizen on its deathbed.

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One Response to don’t drink the water

  1. postmillenial says:

    Redesigning Bells Corners (notes for a 2015 grade 9 Bell High School geography assignment) Bells Corners Sustainability and Redevelopment

    Bells Corners is a very nice place to live in, work, and go to school in. The current community is pretty sustainable. However, changes can be made to make Bells Corners even more sustainable and better.

    Housing
    Houses around Bell High School will be moved to near where I live. I live in Bells Corners West (Forestview Crescent near Franco­Ouest High School). They would also be moved to the areas along the old Robertson Road alignment (not the new alignment). People will travel on the new alignment. The previous alignment will turn into a residential street. Also, with Phase 3 of LRT to Kanata, people will (be encouraged to) travel on the improved public transport system instead of with their car. People will only need a less than five minute walk to public transport (along/under the 417).

    Transportation

    Automotive and Public Transportation
    In terms of transportation, we can build an underground parking facility. This facility will have greenspace on top. It will not be a field of asphalt and concrete. This facility will serve as a place for people to park while they shop at the stores in Bells Corners. In addition, during the rush hours, it will double as a park and ride facility for the LRT and bus systems. People can park here and take the train or bus into downtown. This will help reduce gridlock both in Bells Corners, as well as Ottawa in general. Less people will be driving on the highway to get into downtown in the morning, and home in the afternoon.

    Roads
    Robertson Road will be realigned closer to the 417. This will mean less traffic going through Bells Corners. There will be side streets for people to get from Robertson to their homes. Through traffic on these roads will be prohibited. The current areas along Robertson will be turned into residential areas. Moodie Drive will still intersect Bells Corners as normal.

    Bike Transportation
    Bikes will also have it easier in Bells Corners. A new set of bike paths will be built. Currently, the community is not very bike friendly. There is only about half a kilometre of bike lanes on Bells Corners streets (intersection of Robertson and Moodie). I will change this. On the newly realigned Robertson Road, there will be segregated bike lanes. These lanes will be two­way bike lanes on both sides of the street. They will be completely separated from vehicle traffic. These lanes will also be installed on Moodie Drive. By adding new bike lanes, Bells Corners will have a convenient north­south and east­west bike connection through the community. Cyclists will have more accessibility to the town, and to bike paths in Ottawa.

    Walking
    There are not a lot of sidewalks in Bells Corners. In the redesigned Bells Corners, all streets will have sidewalks on them. Bells Corners currently only has around a 40 in terms of a walking score. This is below the city’s walking score. In the new community, almost all roads will have sidewalks. The only roads with no sidewalks are roads where it would not make sense, or where it would not be economically feasible. By putting in more sidewalks, we hope to turn Bells Corners into a very pedestrian­friendly community.

    Industry
    The redesigned Bells Corners will have better industrial parks and spaces. Eco­industrial parks will be built. Eco­industrial parks are places in which businesses and the local community cooperate with each other to help reduce waste and pollution. There will be one of these in Bells Corners. This area will be more economically friendly than the current industrial areas in Bells Corners.

    Commercial Businesses
    There also will be an all commercial area. It will be like a pedestrian mall. Cars will park in one area, and everyone will be able to walk to where they want to shop. All businesses in Bells Corners that sell products or offer services will be in this area. By placing all of the commercial businesses in one area, people can access all the businesses by foot. Also, this will help utilize the land in Bells Corners to the most by not wasting space on massive strip mall and big­box store parking lots.

    Schools and Religious Facilities
    Schools will be moved to the areas near the newly realigned Robertson Road. They will be located on either side of Moodie Drive, south of Robertson. This will bring schools closer together. It will also give high school students better access to restaurants and shopping at lunch and before and after school. Religious Facilities will also be moved to areas along Robertson Road. They will be on either side of Robertson, east of Moodie.

    Farming
    Farming has been a traditional industry in Bells Corners. The community was a farm town when it was founded in 1851. Today, farms surround Bells Corners, many of them in the Greenbelt.

    The plan to redesign Bells Corners will use the farmland to the south of Bells Corners, as this is right next to the Highway. This farmland will be moved to Bells Corners East. However, the buildings will also serve as a place for farming to occur. The roofs of buildings will be turned into green roofs. This is where plants can be grown for food. Currently, most building roofs are not used, or are used very poorly. The roofs are black, which contributes to heat radiation on hot days. As well, typically only heating, cooling, and sometimes electrical systems are placed on roofs. By using these wasted spaces, we can make the most of our urban areas, and, at the same time, help reduce heat radiation that makes our communities hotter.

    As part of this farming plan, a new Bells Corners farmers market will be established. It will sell products grown in Bells Corners, as well as products grown in surrounding sustainable communities.

    Greenspace
    Bells Corners is surrounded by farmland and the NCC Greenbelt. These will be taken into account when Bells Corners is made more sustainable. There are many parks in Bells Corners.

    In the new community, there will be new areas of greenspace. When houses in Bells Corners East are moved out, the land will either be turned into farmland or Greenbelt land. There will also be greenspace on previously unused areas, like building roofs and former surface parking lots. Greenspace will be used not only for recreation, but for growing food as well.

    Bells Corners has a lot of greenspace. We have to choose how to make the most in terms of using this greenspace sustainably.

    This project will be presented to city council. Funding will come from all levels of government (federal, provincial, municipal); as well as corporate partners. These corporations will be companies that either make environmentally friendly products; or specialize in the environment and environmental sustainability.

    In conclusion, making Bells Corners more sustainable is something that can and will occur. With smart planning, Bells Corners can truly become one of the most sustainable communities in Canada, and even the world.

    *****
    Slide 1 ­ Title
    Slide 2 ­ Satellite Image of Bells Corners
    Slide 3 & 4 ­ Topographic Maps of Bells Corners
    Slide 5 ­ Physical Geography Characteristics
    Bells Corners’ climate is a continental climate. It is a pretty normal central Canada climate. Summers are warm, hot, and relatively moist. Winters are cold and snowy.
    Weather in Bells Corners can change pretty quickly.
    Soils are good for farming in Bells Corners. The soil is full of nutrients which makes farming here pretty easy. Farming here occurs in the Greenbelt.
    Slide 6 ­ Landscape Characteristics
    The landscape of Bells Corners is slightly slanted, rolling, with some hills. The Greenbelt is slightly higher than Bells Corners and Kanata/Bridlewood. This difference is visible during a drive from Kanata to Bells Corners along Robertson Road.
    The Greenbelt surrounds Bells Corners to the south, east, and west. The Greenbelt is made up of wetlands, forest, swamp, and some lakes and rivers.
    There is farmland north of the community, next to the 417, as well as east, next to the 416 The farmland and greenbelt that surrounds Bells Corners limits urban development. The NCC is extremely strict about development next to, and in the Greenbelt.
    There are no other limitations on development. There are no other mountains, valleys, rivers, and lakes in Bells Corners.
    There are no huge developments here like in Barrhaven and Kanata.
    The most significant community expansion was a new housing subdivision built on Old Richmond Road, south of Seyton in 2013. Only two blocks were built. This development was built on previously forested land, but this land was owned by a private landowner, not the NCC, which owns the Greenbelt land.
    Slide 7 ­ Vegetation Characteristics
    As mentioned previously, the Greenbelt surrounds the community. There is a wide variety of vegetation and plants in the Greenbelt. There are many types of deciduous and coniferous trees. White Pine, Maple, Oak, and Birch are just some of the trees that grow in the Greenbelt. Farms also operate around Bells Corners. They grow crops like corn, garlic, hay, and alfalfa, to name a few.
    Slide 8 ­ Vegetation ­ Farming
    Farming has occurred in Bells Corners since the community was founded in 1851. Bells Corners was originally a farm town, with some industry and commercial businesses along Robertson Road.
    Today, farming still goes on in Bells Corners. It goes on in farms east of the community, near Robertson and Baseline, and farms north of the community, near Moodie and Highway 417. Despite being the primary industry when Bells Corners was founded, farming is not as important to Bells Corners today as other industries have taken over. Examples include commercial industries and institutions.
    Slide 9 Land Use and Slide 10 ­ Land Use Breakdown
    There are several different ways that land is used in Bells Corners. ● residential
    ● commercial
    ● institutional
    ● industrial
    ● transportation
    ● recreational
    Residential:
    Bells Corners West is the main residential area in the community. This area is comprised mostly of houses. Most of these houses were built in the mid to late 20th century.
    Up until the 1950s, Bells Corners was a mostly rural community, with very few houses.
    Commercial:
    Bells Corners has many businesses. They are mostly along Robertson Road, the community’s main thoroughfare. There is a wide variety of businesses: gas stations, car dealerships, food stores, hardware stores, restaurants, and much more.
    Institutional:
    There are a few institutions in Bells Corners. There are two government areas, The Fitzgerald Road Complex and The General Dynamics Complex. Both of these areas house federal government workers. The Fitzgerald Complex houses Treasury Board of Canada, and Public Works and Government Services Canada Workers, to name a few. General Dynamics Canada is a military contractor that develops technologies for the military. They work in partnership with the Federal Government.
    Industrial:
    Bells Corners is not much of an industrial area. However, there are a few small, local industries off Robertson Road, on Bexley Place. These small businesses specialize in things like auto works and recycling old technology.
    Transportation:
    Every community uses land for transportation, and Bells Corners is no exception. Several main roads run through Bells Corners (Robertson, Moodie, Richmond).
    Several bus routes serve Bells Corners. These routes go throughout the city and directly to downtown as well.
    Bike paths and sidewalks run throughout the community. Most bike paths are either in the Greenbelt, and are run down, worn paths behind businesses. There are close to no bike lanes on roads in the area. Only in 2013, did the community receive bike lanes. Still, this was only around Robertson and Moodie (less than 1 km of lanes). These lanes are pretty dangerous. Cars constantly are doing things that may harm cyclists. Bells Corners will have to get more bike lanes to make the community better.
    Recreational:
    There are several parks in Bells Corners East and West. They are usually around schools and large neighbourhoods. They provide residents with a place to relax and enjoy nature.
    There could be another land use, protected forest and greenspace. This works in with recreational land use, since many residents and visitors like to enjoy the nature in the greenbelt all year.. However, since the community is surrounded by forest, there is possibly enough land to create another category of land use.
    Land use in Bells Corners is pretty well planned and sustainable. However, it could be better used and more sustainable.
    Slide 11 ­ Population Density
    Population density of Bells Corners West is 3180 people per km squared Population density of Bells Corners East is 1532 people per km squared
    This may seem strange, but this is the reality. Since Bells Corners West is more residential, there is a higher population density than Bells Corners East, which is less residential and more commercial, among other things.
    Slide 12 ­ Population Characteristics
    As of 2011, Bells Corners had a total population of 9,468.
    Bells Corners East:
    The majority of the population is aged 50 to 59
    There are more women than men, but only slightly more
    Bells Corners West:
    The majority of the population is aged 20 to 29
    There are more women than men, but only slightly more
    Ratios of men to women are similar in both parts of Bells Corners.
    Slide 13 ­ Education
    There are many schools in Bells Corners
    ● 1 English Public (Bells Corners Public)
    ● 1 Catholic Public/Middle (Our Lady of Peace Catholic)
    ● 1 English Intermediate (D.A. Moodie Intermediate)
    ● 1 English High School (Bell High School)
    ● 1 French­Catholic High School (Franco­Ouest Catholic College)
    ● a few private schools (ex. Tancock Bell School)
    Bells Corners has a wide variety of education opportunities. There are so many schools here at all levels.
    Slide 14 ­ Unemployment
    I was unable to get the unemployment rate for Bells Corners. I was able, however, to get the unemployment rate for Ottawa. The rate is around 7% (7.5%). This unemployment rate is slightly higher than provincial average of around 6 to 7 percent. The high rate is mostly due to technology sector slowdown, however this sector has been gaining steam since the 2009 financial crisis.
    Slide 15 ­ More Population Characteristics
    The average age of the population in Bells Corners is 39.2 (39) years old.
    Most people in Bells Corners are either legally married and single (and never married). There is a very large cultural diversity in Bells Corners. In the community, there are around 5 churches and one mosque. Bells Corners is not as big of an immigrant community as other communities, like Bayshore are.
    Slide 16 ­ Sustainable Strategies
    I am going to talk about how to make Bells Corners more sustainable in detail now. There are many ways I am going to redesign Bells Corners.
    To start with, houses and businesses will be more eco­friendly. Roofs of buildings will have plants on them. These plants will absorb water that falls onto the roof and help keep the temperature of the roof down, thus, lowering heat radiation in the summer. Furthermore, the plants can be crops. The roofs of houses and buildings will now also serve as a kind of mini­farm. The produce that is grown on the roofs will be consumed by the homeowners, and harvested and sold at the new local farmers’ market set to open. All the rainwater that falls onto the roofs of the houses will be collected.
    Eco­Industrial parks will be built. These will feature industries cooperating with each other to reduce their environmental impact.
    There also will be an all commercial area. It will be like a pedestrian mall. Cars will park in one area, and everyone will be able to walk to where they want to shop. All businesses in Bells Corners that sell products or offer services will be in this area.
    In the new commercial/institutional area, there will be a new underground parking structure built. It will have parkland on top of it. Cars can park here and shop at all the businesses in Bells Corners, which will be in a new pedestrian mall. People can also park here if they want to take the train and bus to downtown. The lot will double as an OC Transpo park and ride facility.
    All buildings will use renewable energy sources. Power from the Ottawa River will be used to power businesses and homes, along with power from solar panels and wind turbines. Power from non­renewable resources will be phased out and will eventually end altogether.
    Slide 17 ­ Sustainable Strategies (CONT.)
    I am going to move the community onto the farmland next to the 417. This will place the community closer to the highway and future LRT transit. By placing the community next to the
    highway, access to the community by car and transit will improve. Also, people can take the train to downtown instead of using their cars. This will cut down on pollution, congestion, and help the economy.
    The community will also be more bike friendly. Currently, the community is not bike friendly. There is only about half a kilometre of bike lanes on Bells Corners streets (intersection of Robertson and Moodie). I will change this. On the newly realigned Robertson Road, there will be segregated bike lanes. These lanes will be two­way bike lanes on both sides of the street. They will be completely separated from vehicle traffic. These lanes will also be installed on Moodie Drive. By adding new bike lanes, Bells Corners will have a convenient north­south and east­west bike connection through the community. Cyclists will have more accessibility to the town, and to bike paths in Ottawa.
    This picture shows what the new roads would look like. It is actually a city­designed image of new bike lanes along Hope Side Road.
    There will be new sidewalks on almost every street. Currently, only main streets have sidewalks. In the new community, there will be sidewalks on almost every street. Residential and secondary streets will now get sidewalks. A few streets won’t get sidewalks due to factors like too low traffic, not economically feasible, etc…
    Slide 18 ­ In Closing
    In closing, Bells Corners is a great community as­is. However, things can be changed and done to make Bells Corners the best and most sustainable community it can be. There are many things to do if Bells Corners wants to be sustainable. With everyone’s help and cooperation, it can and will be done.
    Slides 19 and 20 ­ Bibliography
    Works Cited
    “20 Fitzgerald Road”. Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Bells Corners BIA Logo”. PHOTO. Bells Corners BIA. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Bells Corners Car Culture”. PHOTO. Bells Corners WordPress.
    viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Bells Corners East”. Ottawa Neighbourhood Study. viewed Wednesday, June 3, 2015.
    “Bells Corners West”. Ottawa Neighbourhood Study. viewed Wednesday, June 3, 2015.
    “Bell High School”. PHOTO. Study Ottawa. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Corn Field”. PHOTO. Millennium Male. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Employment”. City of Ottawa. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Google Maps Result ­ Bells Corners”. PHOTO/MAP. Google Maps.
    viewed Tuesday, June 2, 2015
    “Green Roof at Vendee Hall”. PHOTO. Wikipedia. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Hope Side 4 Lane Design”. PHOTO. City of Ottawa. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Average Temperatures”. PHOTO. Climate Temps. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Our Head Office”. PHOTO. General Dynamics Canada. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “Real Estate Market Report for Bells Corners Station, Ontario”.
    Canadian Real Estate Wealth. viewed Wednesday, June 3, 2015.
    “Silver Spring Farm”. PHOTO. Unknown Blogspot Blog. viewed Thursday, June 4, 2015.
    “The Atlas of Canada ­ Toporama”. The Atlas of Canada/Natural Resources Canada. viewed Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

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